Track Policies

Symposium 00: A Roadmap for Standards-based Data Integration in Biodiversity Science

Through 2015-16, TDWG has made some important advances; we uncoupled and rebuilt our aging collaboration infrastructure, we transitioned a large amount of our support for collaboration to the GitHub platform; and we have seen the completion of a draft standard for documenting vocabularies and another standard for how to maintain a working vocabulary.  With these developments, TDWG is poised to solidify and extend the foundations for integrating information for biodiversity science.

In this symposium, speakers will present a high-level architecture for integrating biodiversity information, the challenges faced by our largest biodiversity information aggregator (GBIF), how vocabulary development can support more sophisticated information integration, and how a platform for social coding, GitHub, can help us collaborate to create more extensive and higher quality standards for biodiversity information.


Directors
  • Stanley Blum, TDWG
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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Symposium 01A: Semantics for Biodiversity Science: Challenges & Solutions

The volume and richness of primary and secondary biodiversity data is growing rapidly, presenting both great opportunities and challenges for research. Even the ability to predict biodiversity’s response to local or global change has come within reach. However, this and other sophisticated analytical methods depend on efficiently computable data, which in turn rests crucially on the computational ability to connect the many disparate data on Earth’s biodiversity. While much progress has been made on digitizing and aggregating biodiversity data in common exchange formats, making the semantics of biodiversity as a knowledge domain machine-interpretable remains in its infancy. Millions of biodiversity records and hundreds of thousands of species descriptions exist only as text in thousands of books and papers in the taxonomic literature. Non-standard and unstructured representations currently hosted by many data providers lead to fragmented and obscured information. While standardizing formats and units is valuable, representing and exposing the underlying semantics (i.e. the meaning) of data collections to both humans and machine agents is equally important to ensure effective interoperation.

The speakers in this symposium will showcase their efforts to enhance the accessibility of biodiversity data through well-defined semantics and/or to develop formal semantics-rich representations and knowledge concepts. These include, but are not limited to: proposals, extensions, or applications of semantically controlled standard data formats; extraction of structured biodiversity data from text; controlled vocabularies; ontologies; Linked Data and other types of meaningful metadata; as well as any methods, tools or platforms that enable, support, or integrate such efforts. The talks in this symposium will demonstrate how interoperable semantics for biodiversity data and knowledge can enable integrative data analyses that would otherwise be very difficult or impossible. They will also highlight areas in biodiversity science hampered by challenges that machine-interpretable semantics can help to address.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Sophia Ananiadou, National Centre for Text Mining, School of Computer Science, University of Manchester
  • Jose Araya-Monge, Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Riza Batista-Navarro, National Centre for Text Mining School of Computer Science University of Manchester
  • Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforsching
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • Hong Cui, University of Arizona
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
  • Hilmar Lapp, Duke University
  • William Ulate, CBI, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Gaurav Vaidya, University of Colorado Boulder/University of Florida
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Symposium 01B: Semantics for Biodiversity Science: Text mining & semantic role tagging

Directors
  • Sophia Ananiadou, National Centre for Text Mining, School of Computer Science, University of Manchester
  • Jose Araya-Monge, Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Riza Batista-Navarro, National Centre for Text Mining School of Computer Science University of Manchester
  • Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforsching
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • Hong Cui, University of Arizona
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
  • Hilmar Lapp, Duke University
  • William Ulate, CBI, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Gaurav Vaidya, University of Colorado Boulder/University of Florida
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Symposium 01C: Semantics for Biodiversity Science: Taxon names & Traits

Directors
  • Sophia Ananiadou, National Centre for Text Mining, School of Computer Science, University of Manchester
  • Jose Araya-Monge, Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Riza Batista-Navarro, National Centre for Text Mining School of Computer Science University of Manchester
  • Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforsching
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • Hong Cui, University of Arizona
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
  • Hilmar Lapp, Duke University
  • William Ulate, CBI, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Gaurav Vaidya, University of Colorado Boulder/University of Florida
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Symposium 01D: Semantics for Biodiversity Science: Integration & Ecology

Directors
  • Sophia Ananiadou, National Centre for Text Mining, School of Computer Science, University of Manchester
  • Jose Araya-Monge, Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Riza Batista-Navarro, National Centre for Text Mining School of Computer Science University of Manchester
  • Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforsching
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • Hong Cui, University of Arizona
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
  • Hilmar Lapp, Duke University
  • William Ulate, CBI, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Gaurav Vaidya, University of Colorado Boulder/University of Florida
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Symposium 02: BHL: 10 Years of Innovation and Growth

As the world’s largest open access digital library for biodiversity literature, the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is an unparalleled resource that has forever changed the way researchers around the globe understand, describe, and conserve life on Earth. BHL has become not only a model for digital libraries but also a fundamental resource for taxonomic literature aggregation, discovery and presentation by engaging the taxonomic community and responding to user needs. To achieve this, BHL relies on many standards and tools, such as Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), and Global Names Architecture (GNA). These standards and tools help ensure that data in and about the literature matches the needs and expectations of the scientific community and is readily available for widespread reuse. Recently, BHL has embarked on a variety of new initiatives designed to further facilitate research and discovery, including games to crowdsource the improvement of Optical Character Recognition (OCR), citizen science driven transcription and illustration metadata enhancement, projects to support consortia and collection growth, expanded global partnerships, integration of field notes, and the implementation of social tools to support community discussion around BHL’s collections. BHL is not a static endeavor.  To meet the evolving needs and expectations of researchers, we must continually innovate and adapt to the changing technological landscape.  BHL is in the process of organizing widespread user needs analysis and an environmental scan of information resources to define requirements for a next generation digital library.

This symposium will discuss these new projects and their anticipated impact on scientific and taxonomic research as well as solicit feedback from the TDWG community about the current trajectory of BHL,  directions for future developments, and guidance on additional standards that would enable further integration of BHL data with other projects.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Grace Costantino, Outreach and Communication Manager Smithsonian Libraries | Biodiversity Heritage Library
  • Martin Kalfatovic, Smithsonian
  • Constance Rinaldo, Ernst Mayr Library, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
  • Carolyn Sheffield, Smithsonian
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Symposium 03: Interoperability and Data Provenance for Online Crowdsourcing of Biodiversity Specimens

Engagement of online volunteers (often called citizen scientists or crowdsourcers) has the potential to simultaneously advance biodiversity specimen digitization, STEM literacy, and support for biocollections.  And this type of engagement scales well, since anyone with an internet connection can participate, and there is not a need to find a desk for the contributor.  These strengths have led to a flurry of activity in that area in the last four years, and it is time that relevant community members leverage what is now a relatively mature understanding of how to do this successfully for their own projects into standards and protocols that will enable interoperability among their individual projects and other relevant actors (e.g., specimen databases) and adequately document the provenance of data created in this way.

We propose a TDWG symposium that will include a selection of the five major online transcription platforms in our domain—DigiVol, Les Herbonautes, Notes from Nature, Smithsonian Institution’s Transcription Center, and Symbiota—as well as Biospex and the Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing Biocollections (WeDigBio) Event.  The latter two projects are designed to advance the use of the transcription platforms by streamlining onboarding of new projects and repatriation of data (Biospex) and energizing the volunteer community (the WeDigBio Event).  Each speaker will be asked to outline their project needs, as they relate to the topic of the symposium.

The speaker roster is currently filled for this symposium. Only invited abstracts will be considered; unsolicited submissions will be reassigned to general contributions.

Directors
  • Simon Chagnoux, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN)
  • Libby Ellwood, Florida State University iDigBio
  • Paul Flemons, Australian Museum
  • Edward Gilbert, Arizona State University
  • Rob Guralnick, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Paul Kimberly, Smithsonian Institution
  • Kevin Love, iDigBio
  • Austin Mast, Department of Biological Science Florida State University
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Symposium 04: Using Data Visualisation for Sustainable Biodiversity: Knowledge and Insights from Heterogeneous Data

To facilitate conservation efforts and develop sustainable policies there is an increased demand for data and multidimensional information on different aspects of biodiversity in an easy to understand format. With the technological advancements and data mobilisation efforts globally, a vast amount of complex and heterogeneous biodiversity data is becoming accessible to biodiversity scientists and decision makers. However, adequate use of biodiversity data has been a major challenge due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of the datasets, leading to difficulties in comprehending, deciphering and communicating the information.

Data visualisation plays a crucial role in communicating complex and diverse information due to its ability to condense large amount of information in understandable form.  Over the last few years, there have been significant developments in the field of scientific data visualisation and its increased use at different stages of the research data lifecycle. In the recent past, biodiversity scientists have started to exploit the power of data visualisation to gain insights and comprehend multidimensional biodiversity data. However, due to limited data visualisation skills and awareness, many biodiversity scientists are unable to intimately interact with the data to gain deeper insights and communicate the outcomes effectively. Despite the presence of advanced and sophisticated tools, smart use of scientific data visualisations to produce informative, engaging and unbiased visualisations illustrating deeper links, have received little attention in the field of biodiversity science.

In this symposium, we want to bring together biodiversity researchers with and without experience  in scientific data visualisation to discuss and share experiences on (1) the use of various data visualisations and tools in different areas of biodiversity research, (2) the challenges faced by biodiversity scientists and informaticians in using data visualisations for different stages of biodiversity data lifecycle (3) what are the skillsets required by biodiversity researchers to design and create sophisticated data visualisations based on the context of the datasets? (4) which are the critical considerations that are needed to avoid hindrances in graph comprehension and presentation and (5) how to foster knowledge exchange between scientific data visualisation experts and biodiversity researchers to exploit the power of data visualisations?

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Jitendra Gaikwad, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig
  • Pawandeep Kaur, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
  • Friederike Klan, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
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Symposium 05: Big Data Analysis Methods and Techniques as Applied to Biocollections

TDWG’s long history of advocating for standards in the representation of biodiversity data has contributed to the development of an incredible quantity of machine-readable information being available for processing. The biodiversity research community is just beginning to fully realize the potential provided as a result of the many different data sources being published.

At TDWG 2016 we wish to provide a forum to present and discuss the issues associated with working with large datasets from multiple sources, such as cross-linking entities with imprecise identifiers, interpreting natural language using text mining, building clusters from data, high-speed searching of data, and visualizing millions of records.

Our goal is to stimulate conversations about the technical tools people are using to work with large data, the algorithms they are finding useful, and how the data that is available effects those. This goal meshes well with this year’s conference themes of data standards, data visualization, quality assessment, informatics, and image processing. This session will provide an opportunity for the people implementing this research to share notes and ideas and, we hope, start new collaborations.

We propose a hybrid symposium/workshop format where presenters will be given 25 minutes for their talks and follow-up questions from the audience. Presenters will be highly encouraged to include as part of their talk a demo of their running software or analyses, descriptions of features of the data that help or hinder analysis, sample code or pseudo-code, or a discussion of the merits of the software or libraries used in their analyses. The final 15 minutes of each 90 minute section will be used for open discussion of the demonstrated methods.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Matthew Collins, University of Florida
  • Jennifer Hammock, Smithsonian Institution
  • Alexander Thompson, UF ACIS Lab, iDigBio
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Symposium 06A: Biodiversity Data Quality – issues, methods and tools

The goal of this Symposium is to discuss concepts, problems, policies, metadata, methodologies and mechanisms related to biodiversity data quality, which can be reused by the biodiversity informatics community collaboratively and incrementally.

Data quality is a major concern in biodiversity informatics. The distributed nature of data acquisition and digitization, the specific difficulties imposed by some of the data sub-domains, such as taxonomic data and geographic data, among other aspects, make it important to discuss data quality in biodiversity so that data made available in portals and other systems can be used for various purposes such as education, science, and decision-making.

Although several initiatives in the biodiversity informatics community have been developing tools and best practices about data quality, there is no consensus related to concepts, metadata, policies, methodologies and tools about data quality. The size of the data quality check pipelines has also posed challenges for existing methodologies and tools and may need to drive some of the discussion on concepts and policies.

Previous symposia on data quality were held at the TDWG meetings in Florence, 2013, and Jönköping, 2014. As a result, a joint TDGW/GBIF Interest Group on Data quality was proposed and approved. Subsequently three task groups were also created: TG1 - Framework for coordination, TG2 - Tools, services and workflows, and TG3 - Use case library. They tackle some of the most important issues identified by the significant number of attendants to the symposia, most of whom also registered at the GBIF community site that is used as a communication platform. In March 8-11, 2016, in São Paulo, Brazil, the IG and TGs conveners got together with members from two Fitness-for-use groups supported by GBIF and have made good progress towards adopting a common conceptual basis and developing profiles for biodiversity data use cases.

In this 3rd Symposium we want to advance further on those discussions and increase participation of other stakeholders, keeping the same principles: discuss and share experiences on the ways we deal with Data Quality in the Biodiversity Informatics community, avoiding duplication of efforts and sharing knowledge.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Arthur Chapman, Australian Biodiversity Information Services
  • Antonio Saraiva, University of Sao Paulo
  • Alexander Thompson, UF ACIS Lab, iDigBio
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Symposium 06B: Biodiversity Data Quality – issues, methods, and tools

The goal of this Symposium is to discuss concepts, problems, policies, metadata, methodologies and mechanisms related to biodiversity data quality, which can be reused by the biodiversity informatics community collaboratively and incrementally.

Data quality is a major concern in biodiversity informatics. The distributed nature of data acquisition and digitization, the specific difficulties imposed by some of the data sub-domains, such as taxonomic data and geographic data, among other aspects, make it important to discuss data quality in biodiversity so that data made available in portals and other systems can be used for various purposes such as education, science, and decision-making.

Although several initiatives in the biodiversity informatics community have been developing tools and best practices about data quality, there is no consensus related to concepts, metadata, policies, methodologies and tools about data quality. The size of the data quality check pipelines has also posed challenges for existing methodologies and tools and may need to drive some of the discussion on concepts and policies.

Previous symposia on data quality were held at the TDWG meetings in Florence, 2013, and Jönköping, 2014. As a result, a joint TDGW/GBIF Interest Group on Data quality was proposed and approved. Subsequently three task groups were also created: TG1 - Framework for coordination, TG2 - Tools, services and workflows, and TG3 - Use case library. They tackle some of the most important issues identified by the significant number of attendants to the symposia, most of whom also registered at the GBIF community site that is used as a communication platform. In March 8-11, 2016, in São Paulo, Brazil, the IG and TGs conveners got together with members from two Fitness-for-use groups supported by GBIF and have made good progress towards adopting a common conceptual basis and developing profiles for biodiversity data use cases.

In this 3rd Symposium we want to advance further on those discussions and increase participation of other stakeholders, keeping the same principles: discuss and share experiences on the ways we deal with Data Quality in the Biodiversity Informatics community, avoiding duplication of efforts and sharing knowledge.

Directors
  • Arthur Chapman, Australian Biodiversity Information Services
  • Antonio Saraiva, University of Sao Paulo
  • Alexander Thompson, UF ACIS Lab, iDigBio
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Symposium 09: Agricultural Biodiversity Standards and Semantics

Standards for managing information about Agricultural Biodiversity are a critical societal need. Among the UN's Sustainable Development Goals are numbers 12 and 15, which call for feeding the world while reducing impacts on climate, soil, water, and biodiversity. In order to achieve these goals, we must get the most value out of both old and new data and information. The Global Biodiversity Information Facility recently released data fitness for use recommendations for agrobiodiversity, and research by Bioversity International and the USDA Agricultural Research Service and others on conserving genetic biodiversity of crop plants is widely recognized in importance. However, other types of biodiversity are less appreciated by traditional agricultural scientists, and they do not contribute their data to repositories for “traditional” biodiversity inventories. Yet they have a wealth of data, often collected over years in field experiments designed to show differences in how cropping systems affect fauna (herbivores, pollinators, and predators) and their phenology. Discovering and re-purposing the enormous quantities of data produced by the agricultural research community would require a certain modification of systems. What standards and ontologies would be required and what is missing from them?  How can we mine existing datasets or motivate agricultural scientists to contribute new data to the global conversation? Integrating biodiversity data with various crops, cropping systems, and cultural practices could well provide insights for pollination services, predator/prey dynamics, epidemiology of plant viruses, and long distance movement of pests. Recent developments in agricultural semantics (e.g. the Global Agricultural Concept Scheme, the Plant Ontology) and commitments for open data (GODAN Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition http://godan.org) and several new data repositories present opportunities. Speakers in this symposium will pursue synergies between biodiversity information standards and ontologies and the blossoming world of agricultural data management.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
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Symposium 10: Citizen Science for Biodiversity Research

The majority of the data in GBIF comes from citizen science programs. Furthermore there are many more citizen science biodiversity projects that are not yet contributing data to GBIF but could. Therefore, an important goal for TDWG is to development stronger connections to the citizen science community. The purpose of the symposium is to provide a venue for citizen science practitioners to describe their biodiversity projects and to learn about the TDWG community.  Citizen science encompasses a diversity set of activities that contribute to biodiversity research including decoding and transcribing museum labels, collecting specimens and images, analyzing online images, and doing field surveys. The symposium will give an opportunity of bioinformaticists to compare and contrast approaches used in citizen science programs and to share insights about some of the unique standards issues needed for the citizen science community.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Etienne Cartolano, University of Sao Paulo - USP
  • Robert Stevenson, UMass Boston
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Symposium 12: Globally Unique Identifiers for Names

Review the current status and future direction for the use of globally unique identifiers for names of organisms and related data (e.g. concepts, utilizations, etc.)

We believe this is an important foundational TDWG topic related to standards and support of biodiversity research which is in support of the theme. And, Rich is convenor of the Taxon Names and Concepts Interest Group.

We think it would be beneficial to have a symposium on global identifiers for names in order to bring together those actively working in this area and potentially kick off a task group to update the GUID and Life Sciences Identifiers applicability statement and related standards.

Organizers will consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Chuck Miller, Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Richard Pyle, Bishop Museum 1525 Bernice Street Honolulu, HI 96817
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Symposium 13: DNA-based species and taxon occurrences

This symposium will bring together researchers who are working with DNA-based species approaches and associated standards. There is still major gap between taxon occurrence data which are based on (living) specimens or human observations and on DNA sequences from any biological samples (incl. soil, water, air). These data are often accumulating in different databases and are not compatible with each other partly because of missing knowledge about useful data standards. This is especially evident in taxa were most new occurrence data are produced in High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS) studies. For example, HTS analyses of freshwater, marine, soil, etc. samples are generating millions of occurrences which are currently difficult, or mostly impossible, to search through common portals which rely on taxon names (GBIF, GGBN, etc.) This restricts research in many other fields, including nature conservation. Our goal is to give broad overview how these issues are met in research and in corresponding digital archives like GBIF, INSDC, UNITE, GGBN, BOLD etc.

Organizers may consider relevant contributions to this track.

Directors
  • Urmas Kõljalg, Prof.
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Workshop 01: Towards Best Practices for the Implementation and Documentation of Biodiversity Informatics Services

One of the important objectives of the TDWG Biodiversity Services and Clients Interest Group (BSC, http://www.tdwg.org/activities/biodiversity-services-clients/charter/) is to promote common service API design, documentation, and registration principles, which would greatly improve the interoperability of biodiversity web services and their applicability in workflow systems. To this end, the interest group compiles existing best practice documents and recommendations and assesses their applicability in the field of biodiversity informatics.

The workshop will review and discuss the findings so far, identify missing components, and discuss a roadmap towards a TDWG Applicability Statement.

No additional speakers will be accepted to this track.

Directors
  • Anton Güntsch, Freie Universität Berlin Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Paul Morris, The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
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Workshop 03A: Darwin Core Invasive Species Extension Hackathon: six schemas for GitHub

TDWG's Invasive Species Interest Group, under the auspices of the Global Invasive Species Information Network, has facilitated the creation of a Darwin Core Invasive Species Extension, parts of which have been called the GISIN Invasive Species Status and put online here: http://tools.gbif.org/dwca-validator/extension.do?id=http://www.gisin.org/IASProfile/SpeciesStatus

This instance needs updating and expansion, to include (at a minimum) the terms in the additional GISIN data models called speciesStatus and resourceURL. Because TDWG has determined that GitHub provides the best platform for our standards work, the information associated with the schemas of the GISIN protocol at http://www.gisin.org will be reviewed and posted on GitHub during this hands-on exercise.

Because GitHub has been selected as the TDWG standards repository of choice, we hope to move our annotated schemas to that location and better promote it to support leading-edge international invasive species data aggregation efforts. It is also hoped that the possibility of developing a true invasive species ontology will be considered and discussed by session participants.

This is a three-session workshop.

Directors
  • Jim Graham, Humboldt State University
  • Catherine Jarnevich, US Geological Survey
  • Annie Simpson, US Geological Survey
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Workshop 03B: Darwin Core Invasive Species Extension Hackathon: Six schemas for GitHub

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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Workshop 03C: Darwin Core Invasive Species Extension Hackathon: Six schemas for GitHub

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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Workshop 04: Defining infrastructure needs & standards to increase global monitoring through Citizen Science

Although most citizen science monitoring projects are less than 50 years old, they are already making major contributions to biodiversity monitoring on a globally scale.  Some programs are very successful in sharing their data while are number are not yet using the infrastructure developed by TDWG and GBIF. This workshop will address two fundamental questions; 1) What are the barriers for citizen science projects to share their data with GBIF? and 2) What new standards such as common names, survey methods, data quality metrics, etc. will enhance the flow and quality of biodiversity data for citizen science programs? Short presentations will be organized from among the conference attendees and smaller working groups formed. From these activities we will update the citizen science interest group charter at TDWG, make plans for presentations citizen science meetings around the globe, and develop working groups to work on white papers that address the special needs of citizen science biodiversity research.

Directors
  • Etienne Cartolano, University of Sao Paulo - USP
  • Robert Stevenson, UMass Boston
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Workshop 05: How to standardize a dataset to Darwin Core with OpenRefine

Whether you are a biodiversity data publisher or user, you have probably encountered messy data: variations of the same value, inconsistent date formats, incomplete geospatial information, etc. As a nontechnical person, how do you explore, let alone clean and standardize such data?

In this workshop, we will teach you how. With the free, open source tool OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) you will learn how to 1) import a dataset, 2) explore it with facets, 3) clean and standardize it to Darwin Core by clustering and splitting, and 4) exporting it back as simple Darwin Core... all in easy repeatable steps. We will also show you how to link your data to the GBIF taxonomic backbone or the Encyclopedia Of Life by using external services and crosslinking. And we will try to find decimal coordinates using the Google or Mapquest web services. Intrigued? Join us and we are sure that you will become an OpenRefine adept! Note: this workshop contains a theoretical and hands-on session, so bring your own computer and data.

Directors
  • Dimitri Brosens, biodiversity.be INBO
  • Peter Desmet, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO)
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Workshop 06A: Darwin Core: Tutorials, best practices, current issues, future directions

We continue our recent tradition of hosting a Darwin Core workshop combining tutorials with facilitated discussion of current issues and future directions for the standard. This year, we will have two sessions. The first will begin with an overview of Darwin Core and its extensions, and of different ways (e.g. spreadsheets; RDF) to represent Darwin Core data. This will be followed by a presentation examining how Darwin Core is used in practise, which will illustrate the variability in the way the standard is interpreted, and also suggest the most important documentation gaps that need to be filled. We will then give an overview of of the Apple Core guidelines for using Darwin Core in the context of herbarium records. There will be ample time for questions, and for discussion regarding how to move forward on documentation.

The second session will include a presentation on recent proposed changes to Darwin Core around improving the flow of alien species data, followed by discussion on how best to move forward on these proposals. Time permitting, there will also be opportunity to discuss other issues in the tracker or on people's minds, such as the W3C's emerging guidelines for tabular data, interoperability between Darwin Core and other types of data, and next steps in DwC/RDF.

Directors
  • Steve Baskauf, Vanderbilt University
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Tim Robertson, GBIF
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • John Wieczorek, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley
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Workshop 06B: Darwin Core: Tutorials, best practices, current issues, future directions

We continue our recent tradition of hosting a Darwin Core workshop combining tutorials with facilitated discussion of current issues and future directions for the standard. This year, we will have two sessions. The first will begin with an overview of Darwin Core and its extensions, and of different ways (e.g. spreadsheets; RDF) to represent Darwin Core data. This will be followed by a presentation examining how Darwin Core is used in practise, which will illustrate the variability in the way the standard is interpreted, and also suggest the most important documentation gaps that need to be filled. We will then give an overview of of the Apple Core guidelines for using Darwin Core in the context of herbarium records. There will be ample time for questions, and for discussion regarding how to move forward on documentation.

The second session will include a presentation on recent proposed changes to Darwin Core around improving the flow of alien species data, followed by discussion on how best to move forward on these proposals. Time permitting, there will also be opportunity to discuss other issues in the tracker or on people's minds, such as the W3C's emerging guidelines for tabular data, interoperability between Darwin Core and other types of data, and next steps in DwC/RDF.

Directors
  • Steve Baskauf, Vanderbilt University
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Tim Robertson, GBIF
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • John Wieczorek, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley
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Workshop 08: New approaches and tools in Open Data publishing for biodiversity

This workshop will present an introduction to the innovations in publishing biodiversity information provided by Pensoft's ARPHA Writing Tool and Publishing System.

This is a late-breaking workshop.

Directors
  • Teodor Georgiev, Pensoft Publishers
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Lyubomir Penev, Pensoft Publishers
  • Viktor Senderov, Pensoft Publishers Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
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Contributed Oral Presentations

Choose this track to submit an oral presentation that is not part of a symposium. There is limited time/space for these presentations and if there are more contributions than spaces available, they may be asked to present posters instead. Submitters are encouraged to consider the conference themes and present subjects that provoke constructive thought and advance TDWG's mission to promote standards for data sharing.
Note that there is a separate category for formal "Computer Demo" given as an oral presentation (see below). If you are demonstrating software for your talk, choose that category instead.

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
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Computer Demonstrations

Formal computer demonstrations will be allocated space/time with other contributed oral presentations. Note that rooms for these presentations may only have WiFi connections only (not wired), and you may want to have a backup plan should the internet connection not work to your satisfaction. 
Informal computer demonstrations will take place on an ad hoc basis near the posters at times to be arranged by authors. These do not require abstracts and will not be listed in the program.

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Manuel Vargas Del Valle
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Contributed 01: Past and Future

Contributed oral and computer demos

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
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Contributed 02: Inventories

Contributed oral and computer demos

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Contributed 03: Plinean Core, Taxon Traits

contributed oral and computer demos

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Contributed 04: Catalogs, Checklists, & Collections

Contributed oral presentations and computer demos

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Contributed 05: Data Gaps, Trust, Acquisition, Access

Contributed oral presentations & computer demos

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Posters

Maximum size is A0 (84.1 cm x 1.19 cm or 33.1 x 46.8 inches in either orientation).

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Maria Mora, National Biodiversity Institute (INBio), Costa Rica
  • Francisco Pando
  • Joel Sachs, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Manuel Vargas Del Valle
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group/Task Group Meeting

Interest Group (IG) and Task Group (TG) meetings will be a combination of presented content and active discussion. At least one abstract must be provided to give an overview of the activity planned for the meeting and audience to whom it is suited. IGs are required to orally report to the conference.

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Dimitrios Koureas, Natural History Museum London
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Lightning Talks

Lightning talks are 5 minutes in length.  These presentations are designed to announce new activities or projects, suggest creative solutions to existing questions, and/or generate active discussion.  Depending on the number submitted, there may be space for talks to be arranged at the meeting, without being in the program (note this is a special category).

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Erick Mata, Instituto Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 01: Annotations

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 02: Biodiversity Informatics Curriculum

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 03A: Data Quality

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 03B: Data Quality & Affiliated Interest/Task Groups

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 04: Literature

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 05: Paleobiology

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 06: Joint RDA/TDWG IG on Metadata Standards for Attribution of Physical and Digital Collections

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 07: TDWG Species Information

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Francisco Pando
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 08: Vocabulary Management Task Group

Directors
  • Steve Baskauf, Vanderbilt University
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Interest Group 09: Natural Collections Description (NCD)

Directors
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Deborah Paul, iDigBio and iDigInfo
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Opening Session

Directors
  • Stanley Blum, TDWG
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Erick Mata, Instituto Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Closing Session

Directors
  • Stanley Blum, TDWG
  • Gail Kampmeier, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Erick Mata, Instituto Tecnologico de Costa Rica
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
Checked Open Submissions Unchecked Peer Reviewed