Track Policies

General Papers

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Posters

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Interest Group

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S01. Symposium: Biodiversity Informatics workflows and services

The integration of different Web services in workflows using e-platforms such as Taverna (http://www.taverna.org.uk/) and Kepler (https://kepler-project.org/) has great potential to: 1) assess and enhance the quality of biodiversity data, 2) facilitate and speed up analysis and visualizations, 3) track provenance, and 4) integrate with other community’s data sources. In addition, these workflows once designed can be reused and improved upon by the community. Many scientific journals will also allow the publishing of these workflows and associated data as ancillary documentation, which greatly enhances reproducibility of science. These workflows are reliant on external Web services from authoritative sources both specific to the biodiversity domain (e.g., taxonomic vocabularies) and more generally (e.g., georeferences). There are many different service implementations possible, which present a challenge for their integration and deployment as well as their overall usability.


The symposium will build on the success of the symposium on workflows and services convened by Anton Güntsch in 2013. We will continue to explore workflow environments and their utility, with a special emphasis on the deployment of standards and services developed or inspired by TDWG. We hope to foster more development and use of workflows in our community as well as engaging service current or future service providers.

Directors
  • Yde de Jong, Universiteit of Finland (Joensuu)
  • Anton Güntsch, Freie Universität Berlin Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem
  • Bertram Ludaescher, Dept. of Computer Science UC Davis
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Paul Morris, The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
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S02. Symposium: Biodiversity Data Quality - issues, methods and tools

The goal of this Symposium is to discuss concepts, problems, policies, metadata, methodologies and mechanisms related to Biodiversity Data Quality, which can be reused throughout the Biodiversity Informatics community collaboratively and incrementally.


Data quality is a major concern in Biodiversity Informatics. The distributed nature of data acquisition and digitization, the specific difficulties imposed by some of the data sub-domains, such as taxonomic data and geographic data, among other aspects, make it important to discuss data quality in biodiversity so that data made available in portals and other systems can be used for various purposes such as education, science, and decision making.


Although several initiatives in the Biodiversity Informatics community have been developing tools and best practices about Data Quality, there is no consensus related to concepts, metadata, policies, methodologies and tools about Data Quality.


In this Symposium we want to discuss and share experiences on the ways we deal with Data Quality in the Biodiversity Informatics community, avoiding duplication of efforts and sharing knowledge.


As a result of the Data Quality Symposium held in Florence, during the 2013 TDWG Meeting, an Interest Group on Data Quality is being organized and will be proposed to TDWG shortly. The same group of people is expected to attend the Symposium.

Directors
  • Antonio Saraiva, University of Sao Paulo
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S03. Standards for mobilising and integrating sample-based data

(description of what is planned and how it relates to TDWG meeting theme and subprograms)

Biodiversity informatics faces a challenge to meet the goals for sustaining biodiversity: developing the applications and standards for automating the processing of data that would underpin generation of biodiversity indicators in support of the Aichi and other targets. Central to this challenge is the requirement for handling sample based data in a standardised manner.

Sample-based data is available from thousands of environmental, ecological, and natural resource monitoring programmes.  Such data are usually quantitative, calibrated, and follow certain protocols, so that changes and trends of populations can be detected.  This is in contrast to opportunistic observation and collection data, which today form a significant portion of openly accessible biodiversity data.  Sample-based data is often not shared, because the underlying protocols have been hard to encode in a standardised way.

The biodiversity domain has demonstrated two large scale successes in the mobilisation of biodiversity data each with a different approach to standardisation.  On the one hand, the wide scale adoption of Darwin Core (DwC) for publishing specimen-occurrence data, exemplified by museum / herbarium specimens and simple observation events, has allowed a network such as GBIF to integrate over 425 million records from some 14,500 data sets. In contrast, the ILTER and KNB networks, by focusing on standardising data set metadata (as opposed to actual data itself) using Ecological Metadata Language, have enabled very rich, complete descriptions of sampling protocols and methodologies that provide unified discovery and access to richer sample data from some 25,000 data sets, both one-off samples and monitoring data, but without integration at the data level. Each approach provides a partial solution, ease of integration through restriction to a simple occurrence data model but at the cost of lack of expressivity for richer sample data versus fuller descriptions of sampling methodologies and parameters associated with sample data but without a common data model for automated integration.
This symposium will explore recent proposals, e.g., within the EU FP7 project EU BON,  for extending DwC with a minimal set of new properties that allow encoding of the essential characteristics of sample based data while drawing on the existing  tool and support infrastructure offered by the GBIF Integrated Publishing Toolkit. The symposium will also feature other publishing models for interoperable sample-based data.

Directors
  • Éamonn Ó Tuama, Global Biodiversity Information Facility
  • Hannu Saarenmaa, University of Eastern Finland
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S04. Names-based Architecture for Linking Biodiversity Data

This session will summarise the reasoning behind the assembly of an open and free environment of names-based services to help manage biodiversity data.  Progress within the US National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Global Names project in the US and elsewhere will be discussed.  The goal of this session is to establish the process that will lead to an agreed agenda and priorities.

Directors
  • Dmitry Mozzherin, Marine Biological Laboratory
  • David Patterson, Plazi, Global Names
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S05. Access to digitisation tools and methods

This broad digitisation symposium will include multiple sessions, to cover the different elements of digitisation. The key focus will be to cover the developments that are occurring in digitisation but with a strong emphasis on the accessibility of tools and protocols.

Examples of topics include tools for data/metadata capture and enrichment such as Optical Character Recognition (OCR), text mining, Natural Handwriting Recognition (NHR), Natural Language Processing (NLP), their availability and how they are being adopted and adapted. How are these tools being used currently, and how can we ensure that they are accessible to all? In addition, what are the tools in use for image capture and management, quality control and long-term preservation of images? What techniques are in use by many institutes, who are capturing images of their natural history collections and related objects like field notebooks, illustrations, labels, card catalogs, journals, and literature?

Directors
  • Elspeth Haston, The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
  • Deborah Paul, iDigBio and iDigInfo
  • Vince Smith, Natural History Museum
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S06. Distributed Open-Source Development of Collection Management Systems (DINA-Consortium)

Collection management is one of the core tasks of many TDWG institutions, and the data handled by these systems form the basis of many biodiversity informatics initiatives. Collections staff request a lot from their collection management system, and often spends a large portion of their time with it. Collection management systems are still often developed in house, not infrequently by single curators, but this development model is not sustainable in the long run, particularly in view of the increasing demands on collection management systems being online, providing sophisticated web interfaces, and interacting well with other information systems. In the DINA-Specify consortium, we are trying to address these challenges by using a distributed open-source development model across multiple institutions to support a dynamically evolving and sophisticated web-based collection management system.

The workshop is open to anyone interested in distributed open-source development of collection management systems in general and the DINA-Specify consortium effort in particular. We intend to cover topics such as: social and technical challenges of distributed development, modular design for more effective distributed development, integration of existing biodiversity information systems and web services in collection management systems, standardization of data models and programming interfaces, and any other topic related to the theme of the workshop and of interest to participants. The workshop may also include demonstrations of collection management systems, modules and interfaces.

Aiming at collaborative open-source development of a professional collection management system, something needed by biodiversity institutions around the world working, among other things, for sustaining biodiversity, we think the topic of the proposed workshop fits well under the heading of “Applications and Data Standards for Sustaining Biodiversity”.

Directors
  • Gregor Hagedorn, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
  • Elspeth Haston, The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
  • Urmas Kõljalg, Prof.
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Fredrik Ronquist, Dept. Biodiversity Informatics Swedish Museum of Natural History
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S07. ABCD 3: Which Way to Go?

Directors
  • Gabriele Droege, Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem, FU Berlin
  • Jana Hoffmann, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
  • Joerg Holetschek, Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem
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S08. Expanding the Usefulness of Literature in Sustaining Biodiversity

Systematic biology, including species identification, depends, more than any other science, upon historic literature. This Symposium will present how multiple biodiversity information resources are working to enhance understanding of biology and biodiversity through connections to literature.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that work together to change the nature of biodiversity work through digitization.  BHL provides a suite of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to facilitate interoperability with the more than 44 million pages of open access biodiversity literature available in the BHL portal through citation linking, name finding, and metadata harvesting.

Working to support biodiversity research, BHL integrates content into other bioinformatics systems such as the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL). EOL is a freely accessible and trusted digital resource for gathering, generating, and sharing knowledge about living nature. Links to BHL content appears under the "literature" tab on species pages and provides deep background to EOL content. Biostor, global names, zookeys

The Field Book Project (FBP) is an initiative to improve access to original source field notes, diaries, journals and other primary source documentation of field research.  Field notes provide rich data for researchers to understand how biodiversity has changed over time and to understand the historical and environmental context in which specimens were collected.  Starting with the field note collections at the Smithsonian Institution, the FBP provides access to detailed catalog records describing thousands of Smithsonian field books and page scans for over 400 of those volumes.  Efforts are currently underway to ingest those scanned field notes into BHL to facilitate searching across the primary sources and related published literature.  In addition, preliminary work on crowdsourced transcriptions is helping to unlock the data found in biodiversity field notes and will make it possible to run existing BHL APIs, including name finding algorithms, over the transcribed texts.

The symposium will specifically address the subprograms of Semantic Technologies, Capacity Building, Outreach and Collaboration, ePublications.

Presentations will be followed by a facilitated discussion with the audience.


Directors
  • Martin Kalfatovic, Smithsonian
  • Carolyn Sheffield, Smithsonian
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S09. Biodiversity data synthesis and discovery at a Tree of Life scale

Recent technological revolutions in high­throughput DNA sequencing, organismal data collection,
and information digitization have resulted in a massive amount of data and knowledge about
earth’s biodiversity being available in digital form. Effectively integrating and analyzing these data
across the Tree of Life for the purpose of scientific discovery has so far been hampered by gaps
in informatics infrastructure and resources capable of big, Tree of Life­scale data. The
recognition of these gaps resulted in the funding, both in the US and internationally, of large
projects aimed at creating Tree of Life­scale data synthesis and knowledge digitization
infrastructure. Several of these projects are just now coming to fruition. Their products hold the
potential to enable fundamentally new scientific inquiries into the biodiversity and evolution of life.
This symposium aims to illuminate some of the major Big Data capabilities coming online for
Tree of Life­oriented biodiversity science, and to provide a forum in which the projects behind
them and biodiversity scientists on the ground can engage to ensure that the newly created
infrastructure is useful to biodiversity research, and that it interoperates with the wealth of
biodiversity information resources that exist. Specifically, this symposium brings together the
biodiversity information science community with the Open Tree of Life, Arbor Workflows, and
Next Generation Phenomics projects (all funded through the US National Science Foundation’s
“Analyzing, Assembling, and Visualizing the Tree of Life (AVAToL)” program), the Integrated
Digitized Biocollections (iDigBio) project, and the Map of Life and Traitbank projects, two
individual investigator­driven projects targeting large­scale biodiversity information integration and
dissemination.

Directors
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • Hilmar Lapp, Duke University
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S11. Citizen science: a growing approach to biodiversity monitoring

TDWG has traditionally been organized by scientists and organizations affiliated with Natural History collections.  Their vision and efforts have created the field of biodiversity informatics and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). However, data networks such as Cornell’s Avian Knowledge Network (AKN) and Great Britain’s National Biodiversity Network (NBN) Gateway, using the novel “instrument” of citizen science, have become some of the largest suppliers of biodiversity data to the GBIF portal.  eBird the largest contributor to AKN is now collecting data at the rate of 3 million observations per month.  Clearly, Citizen Science offers an important approach to capacity building for biodiversity monitoring.

This symposium presents programs across the globe that are using the citizen science approach for a variety of taxa that address issues of population and community monitoring, species interactions and phenology changes.  See also the follow-up workshop (W05).

Directors
  • Nicole Kaplan, Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Colorado State University
  • Louis Liebenberg, CyberTracker Conservation, Associate of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University
  • Robert Stevenson, UMass Boston
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M02. Distributed Open-Source Development of Collection Management Systems

Sunday, Oct 26; at the Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm

Directors
  • Gregor Hagedorn, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
  • Elspeth Haston, The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
  • Urmas Kõljalg, Prof.
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Fredrik Ronquist, Dept. Biodiversity Informatics Swedish Museum of Natural History
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M03. Persistent Identifier Summit

The primary challenge in biodiversity informatics is analysing and integrating data from many disciplines, in order to understand the planet’s biodiversity.  Persistent identifiers are an absolutely essential component in this challenge, enabling us to track species occurrences, environmental samples, and associated sequencing, collecting, identification, and sampling events that span multiple systems and online databases.

While effort has been put forth on both LSID (Life Science Identifier) and GUID (Globally Unique Identifier) applicability statements, there is still no clear standard for assigning identifiers to occurrences, samples, or events, nor is there a clear understanding of the functions these identifiers should perform in our most relevant databases for handling biodiversity data. Currently, questions of persistence, resolvability, uniqueness, and implementation still have neither consensus or a clear understanding to enact a solution.

The 2014 Persistent Identifier Summit will gather many of the stakeholders in one spot (Natural History Museum in Stockholm), for two days (25-26 October) just prior to the 2014 TDWG meeting in Jönköping, Sweden, with the aim of publishing guidelines for the adoption of persistent identifiers relevant to biodiversity informatics. The Summit is open to anyone interested in working with identifiers.

Directors
  • Nico Cellinese, University of Florida
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
  • Rob Guralnick, University of Colorado at Boulder
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IG/TG01. Biodiversity informatics curriculum/teaching

Introduction

With new buzz words like “Open research data”, “Linked Open Data”, “Data sharing”, and “Big data” in science and funding agencies, informatics is becoming a more and more important approach within every field of science. Despite several major data sharing and linking initiatives and facilities for biodiversity data, biodiversity informatics still lacks recognition as an independent methodological discipline. To establish this status, offering a  biodiversity informatics curriculum as part of all levels of scientific education becomes more and more essential.

Rather than training to use different tools, the BI curriculum Interest Group should lay basis for deeper understanding of the key principles of Informatics and offer a forum for exchanging ideas and viewpoints for teaching whatever tools and technologies are available.

Aspects of Biodiversity Informatics curriculum

Target groups:

  • Undergraduate students (learning the topic from the beginning)
  • Post-graduate (part of producing a thesis)
  • Researchers with established career (with no prior experience of data sharing or obtaining re-usable data)
  • University teachers (for including informatics essentials to their teaching)
  • Museum staff (collection management and taxonomical data workflows)
  • People working with digitizing processes (curators planning digitizing or making contracts)
  • ICT professionals working with BI (planning and building information systems and architectures)

Topics to include into each module from target group viewpoint:

  • Producing data (collecting, identifying and digitizing)
  • Citizen science
  • Obtaining and using data from repositories
  • Culprits of re-using data (known biases and their fixes)
  • Data management / best practices
  • Persistent IDs and linking data
  • Using web-services (how to use web services provided by the BDI community)
  • IPR (intellectual property rights), data policies and collaboration
  • Data types and standards (BD and related)
  • Tools and methods for data cleaning
  • Working on e-platforms
  • Data experiments and workflow environments
  • The “new” ways of publishing data
  • Analyses tools (GIS, R, …)
  • Big data and NoSQL, semantic technologies and Linked Open Data
  • Architecture models and  frameworks (big facilities for data sharing and archival)
  • Long-term archives

How to get organized / interest groups functions

A round table discussion will decide best strategies for fulfilling the tasks, deliverables, and technical platforms for collaboration. Participants at this meeting will decide who will facilitate the activities and polish this abstract to be the official charter establishing a TDWG Interest Group.

Directors
  • Hanna Koivula, MSc, IT-specialist
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IG/TG02. Literature Interest Group

This meeting will explore reinvigorating the Literature Interest Group and discuss methods, actions and standards for working with literature in the context of TDWG standards. Examples of areas of discussion include DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers) as applied to literature; bibliometrics for biodiversity literature; and types definitions of literature used in biodiversity studies.

Directors
  • Martin Kalfatovic, Smithsonian
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IG/TG03. Genomic Biodiversity Working Interest Group (GBWG) meeting

This Genomic Biodiversity Working Interest Group (GBWG) is a forum for discussion of standards crossing the biodiversity and genomics fields of study, with core emphasis on mobilizing usable products and technologies for applied research projects.   TDWG has historically focused on the sharing of specimen-based data through a set of standards including Darwin Core (DwC), Access to Biological Collection Data (ABCD), and TDWG Access Protocol for Information Retrieval (TAPIR).  However, the last several years have seen a swell of interest in including DNA-based information with specimen data and coupling sequence data with specimens and their associated environmental and taxonomic context. Discussion topics for this meeting are: (1) A review of the activities from the last year from the research coordination network for the Genomic Standards Constortium (RCN4GSC) (2) Updates from Biological Collections Ontology (BCO) with a proposal to create a formal BCO task group under the GBWG Interest Group; (3) Discussion of a proposal for creating an ontology for Basis Of Record terms (also discussed in the DwC terms symposium); (4) An update and review of the Minimum Information for any Sequence (MIxS) as RDF effort, and finally (5) A look at efforts to create instance data annotated with DwC, BCO, and the MIxS terms.

Directors
  • John Deck, University of California at Berkeley
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IG/TG04. Interest and Task Group Convener Discussion with the Executive

All conveners of Interest and Task Groups are encouraged to meet with the Executive Committee to discuss TDWG processes, the web site upgrade, and other topics arising. Our all-volunteer association faces many challenges and can always be improved.

Directors
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
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IG/TG05. Annotations Interest Group

The Annotations Interest Group will hold a working session to examine advances in annotation technologies over the last year including use of annotations in the wild in the biodiversity community, and annotation related activities in the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).  Of particular interest are annotations as sets of assertions and their metadata made on biodiversity data by some consumer of that data.

Agenda: (1) Discussion of data annotation systems in production use in the biodiversity community. (2) Discussion of the W3C Open Annotation Data Model Community Draft (OA) and the new W3C Web Annotation Working Group. (3) A charter for a Task Group for an applicability statement concerning the W3C activities. New participants in the Annotations Interest Group are encouraged.

Directors
  • Paul Morris, The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University
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IG/TG06. Traits in RDF Task Group

Following discussions initiated at TDWG 2013 in Florence, the Biological Descriptions Interest Group will hold a working session on describing traits in RDF (Resource Description Framework, a W3C standard). Traits here are defined as any measurable characteristic, phenotype, property, or attribute of individuals or groups of the same taxon. The draft charter for the Task Group proposes work on the following: 1. a specification of an abstract model that supports semantic descriptions of organismal characteristics (e.g. traits, phenotypes, measurements); 2. a list of related standards, ontologies and knowledge bases; 3. recommendations (best practices) for producing RDF descriptions that are compatible with SDD (Structured Descriptive Data, a TDWG standard) to facilitate Linked Open Data (LOD).  Anyone with an interest in these subjects is invited to attend; experience is not necessary. Participants in this session will confirm or modify the proposed charter (draft available at http://bit.ly/1purmaP, to be formally submitted to the TDWG Executive) and then begin work towards the report that will be produced.

Directors
  • Anaïs Grand, Muséum national d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR7207 MNHN/CNRS/UPMC, Paris
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
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IG/TG07. (Proposed) Interest Group on Data Quality

At the TDWG Meeting in Florence, Italy, the Symposium on Data Quality raised a lot of interest and had many contributions. Those present were interested in a continued discussion on the topic and, during the meeting, it was decided that an Interest Group (IG) on Data Quality would be proposed to the TDWG Executive Committee.

After the meeting an Interest Group on Data Quality was created within the GBIF nodes group using its community site tool for discussion http://community.gbif.org/pg/groups/21292/biodiversity-data-quality-interest-group/.

Both groups agreed to merge and prepare a proposal for an IG at TDWG, while adopting GBIF's community site tool as the communication means.

During the TDWG Meeting 2014 an agenda for the coming months will be discussed.

Directors
  • Arthur Chapman, Australian Biodiversity Information Services
  • Antonio Saraiva, University of Sao Paulo
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W01. Audubon Core Implementations

Audubon Core is designed to provide a controlled vocabulary to address the management, acquisition, and content descriptions of biodiversity multimedia. It was ratified as a TDWG standard in Florence 2013. Up to now Audubon Core is a set of terms and vocabularies and not yet implemented in data exchange standards. In this workshop we would like to propose and discuss Audubon Core as an RDF implementation, an exemplary xml implementation of Audubon Core terms in ABCD, as well as best practices on how to use it in the Biodiversity Informatics community. Furthermore a discussion on new sets of terms and other news is possible. Selected abstracts related to Audubon Core implementations are welcome.

Directors
  • Steve Baskauf, Vanderbilt University
  • Gabriele Droege, Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem, FU Berlin
  • Gregor Hagedorn, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
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W02. Effective Biodiversity Data Management Training

In recent years there have been a number of initiatives to provide scientists with proper data management tools for biodiversity data. No matter how sophisticated these tools are, there still seems to be a gap between the technical capabilities of these systems and the scientists’ acceptance and willingness to use these tools. Being aware that this issue needs to be addressed from both sides, with this workshop we would like to focus on the users only. We would like to bring together practitioners in research data management, experts in capacity building and training, university lecturers, and users to discuss the following questions:

  • What data management skills are required by biologists/ecologists?
  • How much data management should be in the B.Sc., M.Sc. and PhD curricula of bio/eco science studies?
  • Do scientists need to know about (meta)data standards?
  • What teaching and training methods are being used?
  • What are your experiences in teaching data management to biology and ecology students?
  • How to increase scientists’ motivation to do proper data management?
This workshop is meant to be a discussion forum for people involved or interested in the topic. The aim is to collect first hand experience from the community and synthesize them into a report.We intentionally propose this workshop to TDWG since we expect the right audience to be present here.

 

Directors
  • Jitendra Gaikwad, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig
  • Roman Gerlach, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
  • Birgitta Koenig-Ries, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena
  • Town Peterson
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W03. Software Solutions for Data Management

We would like to propose an open workshop/session where producers of software for managing biodiversity data will get the floor to introduce their solution. In the first part, we would like to invite to a joint session where all participating software producers may introduce there data management solution in a short presentation (10min). Within the second part, a series of parallel sessions shall be held for a more in-depth (perhaps hands-on) demonstration of those individual products that have been introduced earlier.
We invite all producers of tools and software for managing, sharing and archiving research data in the biodiversity domain to present their solutions and share there experience.
The expected audience for this workshop are scientists, data managers and project managers who would like to learn about new tools/software for managing biodiversity data.
Disclosure: We are part of the development teams of the BEXIS 2 data management platform and of the Diversity Workbench platform and will also present our software within this workshop.

Directors
  • Jitendra Gaikwad, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig
  • Roman Gerlach, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany
  • Birgitta Koenig-Ries, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena
  • Dagmar Triebel, Information Technology Center of the Bavarian Natural History Collections
  • Markus Weiss
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W04. Darwin Core Tutorial and Workshop

The Documenting Darwin Core workshop held at TDWG 2013 combined tutorials on specific aspects of DwC with facilitated discussion around a number of long-standing and contentious issues. This discussion resulted in the development of consensus in several key areas related to revision of the standard. Based on the success of the last workshop, and the scope of the work that remains to be done, we believe that we should be in the habit of hosting a DwC workshop at every TDWG, with one or two sessions of tutorials, and one or two sessions devoted to discussion of issues in the tracker, or on people's minds.

The workshop will comprise four 90 minute sessions, spread out over at least two days, to allow time for reflection and extra-curricular collaboration. Two of these sessions will be tutorials, and two will be facilitated discussions involving issues in the Darwin Core issue tracker. The tutorial sessions will allow new members of the community to get up to speed not only on how to effectively use Darwin Core, but also on the issues to be discussed later in the workshop.

Directors
  • James Macklin, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Richard Pyle, Bishop Museum 1525 Bernice Street Honolulu, HI 96817
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W05. Building Biodiversity Informatics Standards and Capacity for Citizen Science

An earlier symposium presented programs across the globe that are using the citizen science approach for a variety of taxa that address issues of population and community monitoring, species interactions and phenology changes.

In this workshop we will discuss and document issues related to engaging the community, mobile applications, sampling methods, sampling effort, data and metadata models, and data quality.  As an outcome of the symposium and workshop we will write a white paper on the role of citizen science in biodiversity monitoring that addresses its accomplishments and challenges.

Directors
  • Robert Stevenson, UMass Boston
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W06. TDWG Newcomers Chat

The field of biodiversity informatics can be daunting to those who are new to the field. You may be unfamiliar with the goals of the Biodiversity Information Standards - TDWG organization and how it works. Or you may simply want help understanding the large number of acronyms you will encounter this week. If this is your first time attending the TDWG meeting, or if you have attended before but feel you could use help navigating the conference, please join us for an informal question and answer session.

Directors
  • Cyndy Parr, USDA
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